Where the Heart Goes

I’m happy to announce that my novella, Where the Heart Goes, is now available on Amazon for purchase as a Kindle or paperback! The book is a western about a young woman who moves from Philadelphia to Texas in the 1800s on a journey of self-discovery where the events and people in her life bring her to a greater understanding of love. Those of you who liked my short stores from a few years ago will delight in this extended and more detailed story of Becky’s life! (link below)

Coming Soon!

I’m happy to say that my novella will FINALLY be released in November, 2021.

“Where the Heart Goes” is narrated by Rebecca Adams, a strong, unforgettable woman who travels from Pennsylvania to Texas to follow her dreams in the mid-1800s. She shares with the reader clips of the most memorable and poignant moments of her lifetime beginning in young adulthood. It’s an ordinary life in many ways, woven with themes of love, romance, motherhood, abuse, spirituality and death. Yet, Rebecca has a remarkable ability to learn and reflect from the experiences of her heart. She aptly sums it up with, “It’s strange how the heart can take the reins from you but still allows you to think you’re in control.”

When I published two short stories several years ago about Rebecca’s life, I had no idea her saga was not yet complete, on paper that is. The original idea was inspired from an unusual daydream I had of a man riding a bronco, who became the character, John Coulter. From there, the story took on a life of its own and developed into “That’s Just the Way It Is” and “Return to Texas.” This follow-up novella is a deeper and much expanded version of the earlier short stories with more emphasis on the historical times in which it took place. Perhaps its basic theme—deep love that lives in the heart and soul, never truly dies—bears repeating in a world that often appears loveless. It has truly been a joy and a heart-warming experience to write this piece.

The book will be available in paperback and Kindle formats…I’m looking forward to sharing more information with you next month!

Breaking the Rules

One morning, I was meditating and afterwards this short piece below came to me… a good reminder that sometimes we just have to do things our own way!

“Learn what you need to know and then break the rules – the ones you want to.

Don’t try to fit into the mold and lose yourself by beating the same drum everyone else does.

The world thirsts for innovation…new ways of thinking, doing and being to make sense of its complexities.

You will never be like everyone else. Celebrate your uniqueness and revel in your power to control it!”

I hope you find something meaningful for yourself in these words.

Coping with the C-Word

    Feel free to reblog or share this article in its entirety.

Coping with the C-Word

             Shirley P. Sorbello, MSW

“The biopsy results showed cancer cells,” Dr. Wilson said to me matter-of-factly.   I glazed over upon hearing those words, that took me to a level of reality where I had never ventured.

“Oh, no,” I said, thinking at the same time this couldn’t be happening to me. No one ever believes it could happen to them.  People think that somehow it’s everyone else who gets cancer.

At least one in three people in the United States will hear this diagnosis at some time in their lives. Even though advances in early detection and treatment have lessened cancer’s effect as a death sentence, a diagnosis of cancer can still rock anyone’s world as it did mine.

Here are some tips that might help you or a loved-one cope more effectively.

Share Your Diagnosis with Those People Closest to You:  It’s normal to feel shock, numbness and denial at first. While you are trying to get your bearings, you need to share some information with people who love you.  It’s important for you to feel their love and support as you begin to navigate through this crisis.

Although it can be extremely helpful to talk about your feelings, be cautious about sharing this information with everyone.  You may get some unwanted advice and hear horror stories as well.  Be aware that not everyone will react to your news in a similar way.  If it’s not the reaction you were expecting or hoping for, it probably says more about their hang-ups than how they feel about you.  Don’t be hurt or discouraged by it. You will find that most people will offer a listening ear and physical support.  You may even be lucky enough to have a friend who went through what you are going through.  His or her input can be extremely reassuring. If you have any serious questions or concerns, don’t ask your friends, ask your doctor.

Remember, however, that while interacting with others can be helpful, you are your own strongest support. If you can’t talk about it, perhaps you can write about your thoughts or feelings in a notebook or journal.

Make Necessary Appointments:  Whether you need to see an oncologist, surgeon, radiologist, or need more testing, don’t wait to do it.  Sometimes it takes a while to get an appointment.  Procrastination can increase your anxiety. Looking back, you will be glad you didn’t delay. Follow your gut feelings when it comes to getting a second opinion or making decisions about treatment.  Something inside of you knows what is best for you.

Take someone with you when you first go to a surgeon or oncologist. That way, you won’t feel as alone as I did when a bald patient came out of the office shaking her head. I could only imagine the scary news she must have received, and then I worried more about what I was going to hear about myself.

Be Kind to Yourself:  It’s important to nurture and take care of yourself at this time. Do the things that make you feel happy.  Go for that massage you’ve been wanting, see a movie you’ve been thinking about, or buy a new purse or book that will perk up your spirits.  Get your sleep, eat healthy and spend more time with people you enjoy being with.  Remember it’s your turn now to put yourself first.

Continue with Your Normal Routine:   Doing normal things keeps you from obsessing or worrying about what’s ahead for you.  As much as possible, adhere to your regular schedule or go ahead with any special plans you have.  I had been looking forward to a short trip before I was diagnosed.  I choose to go through with it even though it meant I didn’t return until the day before my surgery.  Looking back, I am glad that I went, as it helped to occupy my time with enjoyable moments.  I undoubtedly went into surgery with a more relaxed, positive attitude than I would have if I had been sitting at home worrying.

Stay in the Present Moment:  As much as possible, refrain from “what if’s.”  Take one day at a time.  Tomorrow is promised to no one. Worrying about things that may never happen is useless and will stress you out.

Seek Spiritual Comfort:  If you are religiously or spiritually inclined, you may find comfort in speaking with your priest, pastor or a friend who shares your spiritual perspective.  If your present spiritual perspective does not seem to be serving you adequately, perhaps it’s time to explore some new avenues.  Visit your local bookstore and see what attracts your attention.

Both meditation and guided imagery are spiritually-related practices that are excellent for your health.  If you’ve never meditated before, this is probably not the time to begin as it does require practice and concentration.  If you have meditated before, then you might benefit from returning to a regular practice.  With guided imagery, you need only to sit back, relax and listen to a calming voice on a CD or the internet that leads you on a healing journey of images and positive feelings.  I found that listening to guided healing imagery on the internet prior to my surgery helped me stay calmer and more centered than I would have otherwise been.

It’s Okay to be Afraid: It is normal to feel some degree of fear or anxiety when facing a diagnosis of cancer.  It’s okay to cry.  Acknowledge your feelings, for they are genuinely your own, but don’t neglect to look for that pillar of strength that resides inside of you.  You’ve been through tough times in the past.  What sustained you then?  It’s still there.  Close your eyes, take a few deep breaths and you will feel your strength deep inside.  I promise you it’s there.

Think Positive Thoughts: People with the most positive outlooks generally do better with cancer treatment and recovery.  Think about your life.  What are you thankful for?  Perhaps it’s a relationship, your children or your career.  Being thankful for the good things in your life has been shown to decrease depression and elevate mood. Make a habit of thinking of everything you are thankful for and feeling a sense of appreciation about it at least once a day.

Affirmations can be helpful too.  They are positive statements about “what is.” Look into your mirror in the morning and at nighttime, and say a few times out loud something positive like, “I am radiantly healthy and cancer free.”   Or, make up something that is meaningful to you.  The important thing to remember is to speak as if it is already happening now, not as a future event.

Creative visualization is another useful tool.  Sit down, relax and take a few deep breaths. Close your eyes and picture yourself healthy and doing well in life.  Imagine a neighbor saying to you, “You look well,” and you replying with a smile, “I feel great.”  Picture a visit to your doctor.  He is saying, “You are doing really well.  I am really pleased with your test results.  Keep up the good work.”  Feel the joy!

Most importantly, use this whole experience to look at where you are in your life.  What matters to you?  What is working and not working?  What is it time to let go of?  What haven’t you done, that you’ve wanted to do?  This glimpse of your own mortality can lead you to a richer, more fulfilling life…one that you truly value and love.

www.shirleysorbello.com

Pathways

After a recent trip to Cape May, NJ, I noticed that many of my favorite photos centered on this walkway from a Sunset Beach cottage to the Delaware Bay. Thinking back, I realized how I have always been drawn to photos of pathways.

Perhaps, the times I enjoy them the most are when I am examining my own life’s pathway. Following a new road can be exciting, scary, and wonderful. The uncertainty of it all can be very enticing. The opportunities it brings can be challenging and stressful. Nevertheless, there is one magnificent guarantee – it will bring change…change which is the driving force of life that frees us from stagnation and allows us to grow.

Desiderata

Forty years ago, when I moved into my first apartment, I came across a beautiful plaque and purchased it for my new home. The wise words written upon it resonated with me from the moment I read them. Back in the 70s, the author was unknown, but it was later discovered to be Max Ehrmann, an American, who had originally published this piece in 1927.

I hope you enjoy reading, or re-reading them if you’ve come across this before. 

Happy New Year!  May 2016 be one of your best!

Desiderata ( in Latin, “desired things”)

“Go placidly amid the noise and the haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all persons.

Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even to the dull and the ignorant; they too have their story.

Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain or bitter, for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.

Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.

Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals, and everywhere life is full of heroism.

Be yourself. Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment, it is as perennial as the grass.

Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth.

Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.

Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here.

And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be.

And whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life, keep peace in your soul. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.’

Max Ehrmann

A Fall Escape

Last week, I was back on the road for a trip to Virginia—one last getaway before winter sets in.

On the way, I stopped in Maryland on a lovely, warm day to visit fellow blogger, Robin, who was kind enough to invite me to her home for lunch. We talked as if we had know each other for years; it’s nice to discover that real friendships can develop over the internet.

Walking through the woods with Robin.

Walking through the woods with Robin.

My destination was Virginia Beach, VA where I attended a three-day conference, “Life Beyond Death,” at Edgar Casey’s Association for Research and Enlightenment. Two of the psychic speakers, Lisa Williams and John J. Oliver, were especially awesome.

Association for Research and Enlightenment

Association for Research and Enlightenment

When I arrived at the hotel, this lovely view of a rainbow, or two, welcomed me. I grabbed this photo with my cell phone as I hadn’t brought my camera to the room.

Virginia Beach, VA

Virginia Beach, VA

Next morning, this was the view of the sunrise from my hotel window. The weather turned rainy and cooler after this.

Sunrise on Virginia Beach

Sunrise on Virginia Beach

The day I left, I stopped by Chincoteague Island, VA to see the wild ponies. None seemed to be on the beach.

Chincoteague Island

Chincoteague Island

Finally, I found some at quite a distance (my camera was zoomed to the max), maybe half a mile away.

Ponies on Chincoteague Island.

Ponies on Chincoteague Island.

At the end of my journey, I stopped by Rehoboth Beach in Delaware on a very blustery day.

Rehoboth Beach

Rehoboth Beach

I find that it’s always good to get away, but just as nice to return home with an updated perspective on life. I leave you with the words of Lin Yutang ~ “No one realizes how beautiful it is to travel until he comes home and rests his head on his old, familiar pillow.”